Empower

The Heroism Of West African Ebola Workers | WGBH News

An Ebola virus quarantine in Eastern Sierra Leone. Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn said community leaders have been doing the bulk of work to combat the virus, while world leaders stand by. Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/69583224@N05/ / Flickr

An Ebola virus quarantine in Eastern Sierra Leone. Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn said community leaders have been doing the bulk of work to combat the virus, while world leaders stand by. Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/69583224@N05/ / Flickr

The Ebola outbreak is a crisis that exists on a level above political and geographical boundaries. The rapid spread has forced organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO) to wrangle with politicians and governing bodies. The process has been slow and fraught. "Someone has to stop this. It's not going to be the WHO. It's not going to be the government of these nations. ... They basically shook their heads, and sat on their fingers for months before they did anything, as has most of the West."

By necessity, other actors have stepped in to fill the void, and they've done so at great risk to their lives and livelihood. But what type of person puts herself in the middle of a humanitarian crisis?"

It's less about characteristics, and more about the inner power and spirit that lies within us, often dormant — and then something ... calls it forth," Koehn said. "I think what we see here — and those people who put themselves on the [Boston Marathon] finish line, those emergency workers who just pour into danger zones — is the spirit that gets unlocked, and is incredibly powerful, that makes an enormous difference ..., much more difference than any of these huge, big leaders that we put up on pedestals."

via The Heroism Of West African Ebola Workers | WGBH News.

Step Up | American University

A note from The Power Button: The below video is a fantastic illustration of the concepts of the 3D (Direct, Delegate, Distract) model for bystander intervention, which we discussed in The Speed of One: 4th of 6 Heroic Arts. The Office of Campus Life also has some tremendous resources via http://www.american.edu/ocl/stepup/index.cfm You can make a big difference in the lives of others and change your world. Here's one way to do it.

From YouTube: Step Up is an award-winning bystander intervention program, adopted by American University, that uses five steps to teach students how to intervene in situations including sexual assault, alcohol abuse, mental health emergencies, hazing, and more. Step Up. Be More Than A Bystander.

This film has been created by the Office of University Communications and Marketing and the Office of Campus Life.

Finding you: How to slay your dragon

Finding you: How to slay your dragon

We look at these fictional and factual figures, and we may feel frustrated, and wonder: Why can't I do that?

If we allow those feelings to fester, and we make choice after choice after choice to accept what we can get rather than what we really want, the easier it is to distance ourselves from those figures who have followed their bliss, and more so distance ourselves from the opportunity to follow our own bliss.

So, have you ever had a moment where it seemed as if the most relevant experiences of your life had prepared you for that very moment?

I have.

You were here, now you are lost, & why that's good

You were here, now you are lost, & why that's good

I'm lost. For four years, I have been blogging and speaking about the Heroic Arts and the Hero's Journey. I absolutely believe that there is a hero inside each and every one of us, and I believe in the power of the message.

One of the pieces of advice I have held close to my heart is to find what you enjoy, and to find ways to do that as often as possible.

The question is: How?