Heart of Courage (2nd Heroic Art)

WWMRD (What Would Mr. Rogers Do?)

WWMRD (What Would Mr. Rogers Do?)

Although many years have passed, I have yet to meet anyone, TV presence or regular human being, that has brought the same level of caring, love, and kindness to our world. And anyone taking a good look around our current world would see just how much we need someone to help teach how to manage our emotions and to love our neighbors. But Mr. Rogers isn’t here to do those things anymore, and it’s easy to feel that things will never get any better. It’s easy to be overcome by our emotions. It’s easy to focus on ourselves and forget about our neighbors.

A closer look at the culture of Maryland football

A closer look at the culture of Maryland football

The fact that McNair's death was pointless and wholly avoidable is obvious, and hardly a revelation at all. But, what the player's death and the months thereafter illustrate are the addictive, insidious, destructive, and systematic nature of organizations that are tearing people down rather than building them up.

Hazing & the house's odds

When we actively disengage our leadership and leave the future of our groups to little more than a roll of the dice, those "if's" become "intentional failures" (IFs) because the house always wins. If you play long enough, the house takes you down.

You are powerful, by Tracy Maxwell

You are powerful, by Tracy Maxwell

This is the title of chapter 8 in my bookBeing Single, with Cancer: A Solo Survivor’s Guide to Life, Love, Health & Happiness, and also the topic of one of the sessions in a 5-week tele-course I teach.  The thing is, for a long time, I didn’t feel that way myself. It wasn’t until cancer knocked me flat on my back that I truly understood my own power. The power to heal, the power to make a difference, the power to connect others in meaningful ways, the power to change my perspective. We are all powerful, but many of us are going through life like I was – not recognizing our own unique superpowers, or even actively denying them. 

The Heroism Of West African Ebola Workers | WGBH News

An Ebola virus quarantine in Eastern Sierra Leone. Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn said community leaders have been doing the bulk of work to combat the virus, while world leaders stand by. Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/69583224@N05/ / Flickr

An Ebola virus quarantine in Eastern Sierra Leone. Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn said community leaders have been doing the bulk of work to combat the virus, while world leaders stand by. Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/69583224@N05/ / Flickr

The Ebola outbreak is a crisis that exists on a level above political and geographical boundaries. The rapid spread has forced organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO) to wrangle with politicians and governing bodies. The process has been slow and fraught. "Someone has to stop this. It's not going to be the WHO. It's not going to be the government of these nations. ... They basically shook their heads, and sat on their fingers for months before they did anything, as has most of the West."

By necessity, other actors have stepped in to fill the void, and they've done so at great risk to their lives and livelihood. But what type of person puts herself in the middle of a humanitarian crisis?"

It's less about characteristics, and more about the inner power and spirit that lies within us, often dormant — and then something ... calls it forth," Koehn said. "I think what we see here — and those people who put themselves on the [Boston Marathon] finish line, those emergency workers who just pour into danger zones — is the spirit that gets unlocked, and is incredibly powerful, that makes an enormous difference ..., much more difference than any of these huge, big leaders that we put up on pedestals."

via The Heroism Of West African Ebola Workers | WGBH News.